Frequently Asked Questions

Why did I receive a billing statement from PSA?
The billing statement is for services rendered for diagnostic testing and results requested by your doctor which were performed at the physician's office and/or hospital. These charges are not included in any other hospital, laboratory or physician statement. PSA will file your insurance with the information supplied from the requesting facility and you will receive a statement for the amount you are required to pay after insurance has paid its portion of the bill or denied payment. By providing the most current insurance information, you can help expedite this process.
Where can I learn more about the PSA Billing Statement?
Will PSA bill my insurance company for me?
As a service to you, PSA will bill your insurance company based on the information you supplied to the doctor or the hospital where your specimen, tissue, blood or bodily fluids was taken. After the insurance company has paid its portion of your bill or denied payment, PSA will send you a bill which indicates the amount you are required to pay. By providing the most current insurance and credit card information, you can expedite this process.
Why did I receive more than one bill?
You may receive a bill from your doctor, hospital or laboratory and the pathologist which may appear to be for the same procedure. However, these charges are not included in any other hospital, laboratory, or physician statement. The doctor's charge relates to the professional services provided during your office visit or surgical procedure; the hospital's charge relates to the technical laboratory processing of the specimen, tissue, blood or bodily fluids; and the pathology bill relates to the professional services associated with the interpretation or diagnosis of the specimen, tissue, blood or bodily fluids. Each group will bill you directly for services it performed.
Where can I learn more about health related issues?
What are my rights as a patient?
You have:
  1. The right to request limits on uses and disclosures of your Protected Health Information (PHI).
  2. The right to choose how PHI is sent to you.
  3. The right to see and obtain copies of your PHI. But, note: whether a patient is entitled to obtain a copy of his/her test results is a complicated issue that is also governed by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA) and state law. As a billing agent and for legal reasons relating to patient confidentiality, we are not permitted to discuss test results. Therefore, please contact your referring doctor for information regarding test results.
  4. The right to obtain a list of the disclosures a healthcare organization has made of your PHI.
  5. The right to correct or update your PHI.
  6. The right to obtain a paper copy of the notice of privacy practices on request, in addition to receiving one electronically, i.e., via email.
You also have the right to complain about PSA's privacy practices. If you think that PSA may have violated your privacy rights, or you disagree with a decision we made about access to your PHI, you may file a complaint with the PSA Privacy Director.

You may also send a written complaint to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:

Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
200 Independence Avenue S.W.
Room 509F, HHH Building
Washington, DC 20201

PSA will take no retaliatory action against you, if you file a complaint about our privacy policy.
If you have any questions about this notice, any complaints about our privacy policy, or would like to know how to file a complaint with the U.S. Secretary of the Department of HHS, please contact the PSA Privacy Director.


PSA Privacy Director
Pathology Service Associates, LLC
P.O. 100559
Florence, SC 29501-0559
Telephone: 843 629-2973


Click here to view a complete copy of PSA's Notice of Privacy Policy (opens in a new window).

Effective Date of PSA Notice of Privacy Practices: April 1, 2002, revised April 14, 2003, May 15, 2003
Will anyone other than you require access to your patient account?
If so, we cannot release your protected health information (PHI) without a written authorization.
What is a written authorization?
A written authorization allows us to release your PHI to a family member, friend or other person that you indicate is involved in your care or the payment for your healthcare.
Why is an authorization form required?
As of April 14, 2003, we are required by federal law under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 to obtain your written authorization before using or disclosing any of your PHI. You can later revoke that authorization in writing to stop any future uses and disclosures (to the extent that we have not taken any action relying on the authorization, e.g., billing and collection activities). You can also limit or restrict your protected health information by contacting us via the contact us page.

If you would like to release your protected health information to someone other than yourself, print our authorization form.